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karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 10-02-2016 at 23:56 pm

Tonight I am in the Lake District, standing on a river bank, it's cold,pitch black, a clear night and the sky is full of stars,I'm drinking a glass of Octomore and it tastes wonderful. We all know a special location can make the dram that bit more special. I would love to hear your special location dram stories.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
LukeFive
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 11-02-2016 at 17:51 pm

Nothing like your karloff, 

but once after successful business deal I wanted to tread myself to dinner in good restaurant.
So I went to place called loch fyne restaurant and ordered a baked lobster with chips , bit of salad, butter and their ale as a beverage.
It was all delicous but...
But I wasnt satisfied yet sir.
So i ordered delicious cheese plate and guess what..Lagavulin 16.
It all matched perfectly. The look of that place, the smell of the environment, the atmosphere, the after taste of the lobster in my mouth, the cheeses...
The laga was served in slightly warm glass ( not glencairn ) and the nose was just superb for the occasion.
Actually Im non smoker but after leaving restaurant I have bought the American Spirit tobacco, rizzlas, matches, and rolled myself a ciggy on my way home late evening.
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 11-02-2016 at 17:58 pm
LukeFive wrote:

Nothing like your karloff, 

but once after successful business deal I wanted to tread myself to dinner in good restaurant.
So I went to place called loch fyne restaurant and ordered a baked lobster with chips , bit of salad, butter and their ale as a beverage.
It was all delicous but...
But I wasnt satisfied yet sir.
So i ordered delicious cheese plate and guess what..Lagavulin 16.
It all matched perfectly. The look of that place, the smell of the environment, the atmosphere, the after taste of the lobster in my mouth, the cheeses...
The laga was served in slightly warm glass ( not glencairn ) and the nose was just superb for the occasion.
Actually Im non smoker but after leaving restaurant I have bought the American Spirit tobacco, rizzlas, matches, and rolled myself a ciggy on my way home late evening.



What a great story, nice one wink

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
lincolnimp
Connoisseur Connoisseur
Posted on 11-02-2016 at 21:11 pm
No Karloff I cannot match that but I used to like coming home off a winters nightshift and also clear skies. Sat in the garden looking up drinking a Glenfiddich 18 or two before going to bed.
It worked for me in spite of the cold happy
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 11-02-2016 at 21:30 pm
lincolnimp wrote:
No Karloff I cannot match that but I used to like coming home off a winters nightshift and also clear skies. Sat in the garden looking up drinking a Glenfiddich 18 or two before going to bed.
It worked for me in spite of the cold happy



Yes mate,I fully understand,the cold just adds to the pleasure of the dram going down happy

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
mrgood
Expert Junior Junior Expert
Posted on 11-02-2016 at 23:47 pm
karloff wrote:
lincolnimp wrote:
No Karloff I cannot match that but I used to like coming home off a winters nightshift and also clear skies. Sat in the garden looking up drinking a Glenfiddich 18 or two before going to bed.
It worked for me in spite of the cold happy

Yes mate,I fully understand,the cold just adds to the pleasure of the dram going down happy

Well, yeah, but Glenfiddich 18?  nah, those cold ones are the days when a good strong Lapher really hits the spot.

mrgood
Expert Junior Junior Expert
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 00:02 am
karloff wrote:

Tonight I am in the Lake District, standing on a river bank, it's cold,pitch black, a clear night and the sky is full of stars...

That almost started to sound like one of my notes/reviews. happy   I seriously suck at writing reviews so when I take personal notes it sometimes comes out less like actual reviews and more as nonsense stories that describe the experience in a convoluted opaque way, like this one I recently wrote for myself for a young undisclosed Islay malt...

"Once upon a time, I was sitting by a campfire, burning a peat block, on a damn cold evening, when I got too close to the smoke, passed out, and collapsed face first into the soot and embers.  Luckily I was wearing fire retardant gloves and make-up to protect my hands and face, and a fruit basket (full of apple, berries, blackcurrents) was there to break my fall.  thank goodness there was soap nearby to wash off the soot."

peatbogger
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 01:41 am

Went to Islay last spring, collecting my lease at Laphroaig.

Had the "Distillery wares" tour and filled my own bottle.
All great, except it started to rain as we were finished.
Called a cab that took us to Ardbeg where we had lunch and some samples.
All great too, but we still had Lagavulin left for that day.
Hard to get hold of a taxi after noon so we desided to walk.
No longer raining, but wet and kind of nippy.
Reached Lagavulin, but to late for any tour.
The girls at the reception kindly offered us some "Nips and Nibbles" in stead.
Taking the offer we were led into their "lounge" and sat down waiting.

A strange place; looking like someone decorated their livingroom with inspiration from a cross between an old train station waiting room and a library.
And the whole place was reeking of turpentine.
One of the girls brought our nips and nibbles; a stone slate with two glencairns of Lagavulin and two pieces of spicy chocolatte.
Nosing the whisky, mixed with the background smell of turpentine, feeling the warmth of the first sip through my chilled body, senses confused by the taste of the most sophisticated cinnamon chocolatte served in a rustic museum like surrounding...
Everything just fell in place, somehow not just the choc and whisky, but everything matched just perfectly.
For the time it took to finish my plate, I was lost... somewhere else, somewhere far away, somewhere far back in time.
I was Sherlock in a London tavern seeking clues, I was Connor MacLeod, the Highlander, recooperating after battle, I was the dreaded excise man doing inspection... 
I never thought I would get that kind of trip out of a couple glasses, but it was all in the location.

I believe people that say you should never seek out your childhood heroes, or try to relive your greatest moments, so I hope I won't be disapointed when I go back to Islay this spring, as I have prebooked the "Warehouse" tour at Lagavulin.
Will be interesting anyway to check if the place still smell of turpentine happy
BXpress
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 08:17 am
mrgood wrote:
karloff wrote:

Tonight I am in the Lake District, standing on a river bank, it's cold,pitch black, a clear night and the sky is full of stars...

That almost started to sound like one of my notes/reviews. happy   I seriously suck at writing reviews so when I take personal notes it sometimes comes out less like actual reviews and more as nonsense stories that describe the experience in a convoluted opaque way, like this one I recently wrote for myself for a young undisclosed Islay malt...

"Once upon a time, I was sitting by a campfire, burning a peat block, on a damn cold evening, when I got too close to the smoke, passed out, and collapsed face first into the soot and embers.  Luckily I was wearing fire retardant gloves and make-up to protect my hands and face, and a fruit basket (full of apple, berries, blackcurrents) was there to break my fall.  thank goodness there was soap nearby to wash off the soot."

let me guess, it was a Bowmore.

dave3
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 08:17 am

Where are you in the Lake District, Karloff ? I assume you brought the Octomore with you.

I am heading down to Keswick today and taking the remains of a "105" for company tonight.

karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 09:54 am
dave3 wrote:

Where are you in the Lake District, Karloff ? I assume you brought the Octomore with you.

I am heading down to Keswick today and taking the remains of a "105" for company tonight.



Yes,I brought the Octomore with me. We are staying in my brothers cottage in a small village just outside of Keswick called Portinscale,my brother lets me use it when it's empty,which is rare. Been here since Monday,unfortunately we have to leave today because someone has booked it for a long weekend. Hope you enjoy Keswick,still a lot of cleaning up going on after the floods. Also hope you find a special location to enjoy your 105 wink

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 12:58 pm
peatbogger wrote:

Went to Islay last spring, collecting my lease at Laphroaig.

Had the "Distillery wares" tour and filled my own bottle.
All great, except it started to rain as we were finished.
Called a cab that took us to Ardbeg where we had lunch and some samples.
All great too, but we still had Lagavulin left for that day.
Hard to get hold of a taxi after noon so we desided to walk.
No longer raining, but wet and kind of nippy.
Reached Lagavulin, but to late for any tour.
The girls at the reception kindly offered us some "Nips and Nibbles" in stead.
Taking the offer we were led into their "lounge" and sat down waiting.

A strange place; looking like someone decorated their livingroom with inspiration from a cross between an old train station waiting room and a library.
And the whole place was reeking of turpentine.
One of the girls brought our nips and nibbles; a stone slate with two glencairns of Lagavulin and two pieces of spicy chocolatte.
Nosing the whisky, mixed with the background smell of turpentine, feeling the warmth of the first sip through my chilled body, senses confused by the taste of the most sophisticated cinnamon chocolatte served in a rustic museum like surrounding...
Everything just fell in place, somehow not just the choc and whisky, but everything matched just perfectly.
For the time it took to finish my plate, I was lost... somewhere else, somewhere far away, somewhere far back in time.
I was Sherlock in a London tavern seeking clues, I was Connor MacLeod, the Highlander, recooperating after battle, I was the dreaded excise man doing inspection... 
I never thought I would get that kind of trip out of a couple glasses, but it was all in the location.

I believe people that say you should never seek out your childhood heroes, or try to relive your greatest moments, so I hope I won't be disapointed when I go back to Islay this spring, as I have prebooked the "Warehouse" tour at Lagavulin.
Will be interesting anyway to check if the place still smell of turpentine happy



Yeah,I have been in that room,I know exactly what you mean.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
mrgood
Expert Junior Junior Expert
Posted on 12-02-2016 at 16:03 pm
BXpress wrote:
mrgood wrote:
"Once upon a time, I was sitting by a campfire, burning a peat block, on a damn cold evening, when I got too close to the smoke, passed out, and collapsed face first into the soot and embers.  Luckily I was wearing fire retardant gloves and make-up to protect my hands and face, and a fruit basket (full of apple, berries, blackcurrents) was there to break my fall.  thank goodness there was soap nearby to wash off the soot."

let me guess, it was a Bowmore.

It does kind of have that feel, doesn't it?  Though it seemed to have more oomph than I usually associate with a Bowmore.  My guess was a Kilchoman or Laphroaig... but the fruitiness certainly threw me a bit.  I've since heard from an insider that it is indeed a Lapher (well, mostly Lapher... they dropped a dash of something else in it so the bottler couldn't officially name it.  Maybe a splash of Bowmore to fruit is up a bit?)

BXpress
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 13-02-2016 at 09:33 am
mrgood wrote:
BXpress wrote:
mrgood wrote:
"Once upon a time, I was sitting by a campfire, burning a peat block, on a damn cold evening, when I got too close to the smoke, passed out, and collapsed face first into the soot and embers.  Luckily I was wearing fire retardant gloves and make-up to protect my hands and face, and a fruit basket (full of apple, berries, blackcurrents) was there to break my fall.  thank goodness there was soap nearby to wash off the soot."

let me guess, it was a Bowmore.

It does kind of have that feel, doesn't it?  Though it seemed to have more oomph than I usually associate with a Bowmore.  My guess was a Kilchoman or Laphroaig... but the fruitiness certainly threw me a bit.  I've since heard from an insider that it is indeed a Lapher (well, mostly Lapher... they dropped a dash of something else in it so the bottler couldn't officially name it.  Maybe a splash of Bowmore to fruit is up a bit?)

actually it's the soap which made me think of 80s vintage Bowmores.

karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 20-03-2016 at 17:26 pm

On the subject of MacLean,his top 5 places to drink whisky. 1: Tai Pei,Taiwan. 2:Tokyo,Japan. 3:Zurich,Switzerland. 4:Groningen,Netherlands. 5:Belfast, Northern Ireland.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
lincolnimp
Connoisseur Connoisseur
Posted on 21-03-2016 at 14:33 pm
karloff wrote:

On the subject of MacLean,his top 5 places to drink whisky. 1: Tai Pei,Taiwan. 2:Tokyo,Japan. 3:Zurich,Switzerland. 4:Groningen,Netherlands. 5:Belfast, Northern Ireland.


I suppose it depends on what you are drinking, a crap[y cask can ruin any mood or location.

  Edited on 21-03-2016 at 14:34 pm
Onislay
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 22-03-2016 at 13:14 pm

Was in Groningen this weekend for the whiskyfestival. When this is not on, am not aware of a good reason for me to travel to groningen to enjoy my dram, maybe charles maclean knows more or he is refering to the festival

karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 22-03-2016 at 14:53 pm
Onislay wrote:

Was in Groningen this weekend for the whiskyfestival. When this is not on, am not aware of a good reason for me to travel to groningen to enjoy my dram, maybe charles maclean knows more or he is refering to the festival



Yeah,I should have explained better,these are his favourite places because of the whisky. Funny how he never mentioned anywhere in Scotland,and him been a Scott.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 22-03-2016 at 15:03 pm

He also said he likes to relax with a blend,because malts are work. The poor man,some people have it tough.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
Onislay
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 22-03-2016 at 15:18 pm

Haha indeed I know quite some places in scotland for enjoying whisky... Which i prefer ... Maybe he has access to a secret whisky society in groningen

peatbogger
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 10-04-2016 at 17:42 pm

Been away for the weekend, in a log cabin at a little higher altitude.

Still more than a meter of snow outside the door.
Brought a good selection along, amongst others the AnCnoc 12.
This is a whisky I have found OK, but nothing special about it that would make me think "this is a moment for that particular dram".
And together with a Cragganmore 12 and a Laproaig 18 next to a couple of crackling logs in an open fireplace it felt very soft and out of place.
However, Sunday morning after a solid eggs and bacon breakfast, out on the porch with temperature just about to crawl over 0 as the sun breaks through, this was a whole different acquaintance than the night before.
The initial nippy citrus was still there, but the ending which I had found a bit light and fruity was now full of rich warm nuts.
A perfect compliment to the cold air and warm sun.
So pleasing I'm tempted to add 5 points to my previouse rating of 80 on this one happy
ancnoc-12_zpsvrggloxc.jpg
  Edited on 10-04-2016 at 17:49 pm
Whisky Hamster
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 10-04-2016 at 18:10 pm

For me having a drink at the FOL lounge in 2014 was quite fitting. I liked the serene atmosphere as not many people were there that time. Sadly copy-pasting my pic did not work, any suggestions?


  Edited on 10-04-2016 at 18:12 pm
Oh Laphroaig, where art thou?
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 10-04-2016 at 21:23 pm
peatbogger wrote:

Been away for the weekend, in a log cabin at a little higher altitude.

Still more than a meter of snow outside the door.
Brought a good selection along, amongst others the AnCnoc 12.
This is a whisky I have found OK, but nothing special about it that would make me think "this is a moment for that particular dram".
And together with a Cragganmore 12 and a Laproaig 18 next to a couple of crackling logs in an open fireplace it felt very soft and out of place.
However, Sunday morning after a solid eggs and bacon breakfast, out on the porch with temperature just about to crawl over 0 as the sun breaks through, this was a whole different acquaintance than the night before.
The initial nippy citrus was still there, but the ending which I had found a bit light and fruity was now full of rich warm nuts.
A perfect compliment to the cold air and warm sun.
So pleasing I'm tempted to add 5 points to my previouse rating of 80 on this one happy
ancnoc-12_zpsvrggloxc.jpg



Nice location,and it sounds like somewhere I would be very happy to be. It didn't feel like the right location for the Ancnoc 12, I would have imagined a farmhouse cottage in the summer,overlooking a meadow,but it sounds like it pulled through in the end.happy

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 10-04-2016 at 21:28 pm

For me having a drink at the FOL lounge in 2014 was quite fitting. I liked the serene atmosphere as not many people were there that time. Sadly copy-pasting my pic did not work, any suggestions?




Hamster,I suggested a better and easier way to add photos for the new WB version. I am just a simple gardener,my computer skills are embarrassing, if it wasn't for my daughters,I'd have trouble turning it on.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
Bart&Claudia
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 10-04-2016 at 21:57 pm

https://www.instagram.com/p/BECCUMimJ0u/?taken-by=8artd4men

Did it for me today. 

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