Whiskybase
Overall rating
91.06/100
votes
75
Category
Single Grain
Distillery
Bottler
Meadowside Blending (MBl)
Bottling serie
The Grainman
Vintage
1972
Bottled
01.2018
Stated Age
45 years old
Casktype
Bourbon Cask
Casknumber
13000018
Number of bottles
267
Strength
49.4 % Vol.
Size
700 ml
Added on
02 Feb 2018 5:33 pm by Tauti
UncoloredNon-chillfilteredCask StrengthSingle Cask Whisky

Average value

€ 287,90

33 × in wishlist

75 × member ratings

126 × in collection

Whisky Reviews for Invergordon 1972 MBl

12 users have left a review for this whisky and scored it an average of 91.06 points

  1. hs305 scored this whisky 84 points Connoisseur

    [July, 2018]  Many, many very high scores at 94+ points but also two very low scores by experienced members - so this is a clear case to check this dram by myself.  

    The colour is amber and the texture shows many small tears with rather fast legs (a light oiliness).  The nose is typical grainy with lots of different ripe fruits, sugars, honeys and tons of vanilla with hints of peppers.  Bold and impressive (but you have to like this profile to be impressed) - to me it is somewhat unbalanced with too much vanilla and grainy aromas.  The (grain) whisky arrives light and without any significant mouthfeel on the palate (neither warming nor coating) as could be guessed by the light texture already.  There is an increasing bitter-astringent feeling from heavy tannins (no wonder after 45 years in an oak cask).  The mouthfeel is not to my liking at all (thin and bitter).  The taste is very sugary sweet with again a dominating vanilla flavour beside the fruits, spices and bitter wooden notes.  The vanilla spike indeed reminds me of (bad quality) old rum where they deliberately added a lot of sugars and vanilla flavours to enhance the taste (and to mask the rather young stuff in these rums - you know, in many rum countries you are allowed to state the rum's age at the oldest drop of rum in a batch, even if it is really just one drop only).  Sorry, but this is not balanced according to my taste buds.  The finish is short and predominantly bitter-astringent due to the heavy wood influence (tannins).  Water turns the dram even sweeter and more bitter so I advice not to add any (especially the bitter notes drastically increase).

    I can understand that many members score this high if this is their first very old grain whisky (that provides a completely different profile than malt whiskies - and who can afford a 45-years old malt whisky these days…).  Fortunately, I have tasted many old grains before and hence I score this average best with the nose a little above and mouthfeel/finish below.  If you look out for a truly balanced and excellent old grain go for this one https://www.whiskybase.com/whiskies/whisky/10113/carsebridge-1979-dt - you can find it for very reasonable prices at auctions...
    • Nose
      88 88
    • Taste
      82 82
    • Finish
      83 83

  2. lincolnimp scored this whisky 77 points Connoisseur

    I was expecting this to be much better judging by the scores already posted.
    • Nose
      Quite soft and light but in a good way, white fruits, vanilla & honey.

      Notes of buttercream emerge with some coconut
    • Taste
      Very creamy and a very noticeable bitter note at first which is not good.

      The bitter/sour note persists with some cream, wafer,  a little pear and faints hints of fresh pineapple but you can taste the wood in this one.
    • Finish
      Not that long getting slightly sweeter but overall the cardboardy bitter notes persist.

  3. lincolnimp scored this whisky 77 points Connoisseur

    I detect a lot of bitter and sour notes with this and had quite a bit and it still did not improve.

    On enjoyment I would pay no more than £75 for this, the nose is quite nice but the palate is a let down

    Edit, on reflection maybe even less than £75 but then again it is a massive 45 years old but as is the case here grains suffer just like malts with being in the cask too long and this is an example of that, should have been bottled at least 5 years earlier IMHO.

    This is not worth the money.
    • Nose
      85 85
    • Taste
      72 72
    • Finish
      75 75

  4. knopfler99 scored this whisky 95 points Expert Junior

    A top grain with great integrated flavors. Nothing bothers, no exaggerated sweetness, no alcohol. A nice experience, which you can treat yourself more often at this price.
    • Nose
      95 95
      Dates, oranges and apples rise to the nose when you first try. A herbal note lies behind, not quite whiskey typical you could also have a cognac or rum in the glass. You like to spend some time with this Invergordon, it's fun. After a while, a trail of coconut appears at the very back.
    • Taste
      95 95
      The first sip spreads very mildly in the mouth, the 45 years have done a truly good work. The apple and date notes from the smell have disappeared and make room for exotic aromas. Passion fruit, pineapple and also the coconut plays with it again. All this is surprisingly pleasant - not too sweet, though exotic. A nice sunny day on the sandy beach and then a pleasant refreshment from exotic fruits. Right - just great!
    • Finish
      94 94
      A medium-length finish brings the day to a close in the sunset - the flavors soften slowly and allow a few moments to remain with a view into the distance.

  5. Kalleholzbein scored this whisky 91 points Expert Senior

    • Nose
      90 90
    • Taste
      91 91
    • Finish
      93 93

  6. Drk Neknul scored this whisky 91 points Expert Senior

    Grain? A 'grain whiskey' for the production of which not only varietal barley malt may be used. By the way, at least one single (Invergordon) Grain from a single barrel. After all! All sorts of grains such as oats, wheat, corn or rye may be used for mashing alongside barley. Malted, as usual in malting, but above all also unmalted. 'Cost optimization' is the maxim for Grain, it serves in the well-known blends of Chivas, Ballantines or others but primarily as a cheap filler to complement the taste-setting Malt components. Perfect is the continuous distillation process in, mostly made of stainless steel, column stills, which are basically uninterrupted and therefore much faster and cheaper (industrially!) Can be produced as traditionally. This process, which was developed as early as 1826, guarantees a very pure distillate with a very high alcohol content, but which is just one-layered and less multi-faceted than traditional malt. With the classic, limited to barley malt, two or three times burning after batches in traditional pot stills, as we know it at Malt, this all has rather limited in common.

    Back to Invergordon. As you know, experimenting is about studying and so I used the minutes that I used for the previous lines to bring the Invergordon a little bit to temperature and let it breathe, as befits a 45 year matured whiskey. Let's see what Donald Hart has filled interesting things for us.

    Eye / nose
    Strong amber, very nice oily, with numerous long spider legs, which are visible on the Glencairn, evenly drip the drops along the inner wall of Glencairn along. I note down fresh, fragrant caramel notes, vanilla pulp, orange juice, honey and freshly sawn wood. Some rum impressions, which are known heavy sweetness and some sharpness. No glue, which is common in younger grains.

    palate
    The oily streaks from the rim of the glass are reflected in a fabulous, warm creaminess that is extraordinary even for such a long-matured whiskey. Powerful, with cleanly integrated 49.4% ABV. Very delicious honey sweetness at the tip of the tongue. Powdered sugar, warm butter, dough, canned peaches. In the combination I think of steaming, warm apricot dumplings. Then caramel, orange zest and red apples. The rum from the nose has given way to sweet Rumrosines. Beautiful oak influences, with a barely noticeable, fine bitterness, reminiscent of almonds rather than an excess of unpleasant tannins, despite the decades in the barrel. Good balance of the individual components. Fine drop!

    Finish / Conclusion
    Caramel toffee. Werther's Original? Rather not. White chocolate and warm crème brûlée, again caramel and freshly cooked pear sauce. The aftertaste also knows how to convince. Very nice intense, multi-layered for a grain, just delicious! What's not to like? I have no real criticisms. I have tasted many old grains over the years, few have convinced me more than this delicious Grainman.

    Why are some Grains, which in the first decades of their maturation often seem so interchangeable, with very long storage, usually more than four decades in the wood necessary, so great? Maybe there are other reasons, but at least two are close to me. On the one hand, the more neutral New Make naturally has much less tension than is usually the case with malt. It takes extreme maturity to score points over the barrel flavors. On the other hand, the cheaper grain, which is primarily produced as a cheap filling agent, is usually much less troublesome in barrel management than in the malt. The used (refill) barrels therefore take longer to convey really independent character. If it is true that about 60% of all the flavors of a finished whiskey depend on the barrels and not on the used new make, there might still be potential, you might think. But the bottleneck is usually not the new make, it's just the good barrels that are lacking.

    Further tasting notes and reviews on Facebook at #Maltkanzlei
    • Nose
      92 92
    • Taste
      90 90
    • Finish
      90 90

  7. Drk Neknul scored this whisky 91 points Expert Senior

    Grain? A 'grain whiskey' for the production of which not only varietal barley malt may be used. By the way, at least one single (Invergordon) Grain from a single barrel. After all! All sorts of grains such as oats, wheat, corn or rye may be used for mashing alongside barley. Malted, as usual in malting, but above all also unmalted. 'Cost optimization' is the maxim for Grain, it serves in the well-known blends of Chivas, Ballantines or others but primarily as a cheap filler to complement the taste-setting Malt components. Perfect is the continuous distillation process in, mostly made of stainless steel, column stills, which are basically uninterrupted and therefore much faster and cheaper (industrially!) Can be produced as traditionally. This process, which was developed as early as 1826, guarantees a very pure distillate with a very high alcohol content, but which is just one-layered and less multi-faceted than traditional malt. With the classic, limited to barley malt, two or three times burning after batches in traditional pot stills, as we know it at Malt, this all has rather limited in common. The production of grain naturally takes place in huge factory complexes, which in turn also partly accommodate smaller distillery. Dumbarton and Inverleven come to mind from earlier times. Of course, there is still today ...

    Eye / nose
    Strong amber, very nice oily, with numerous long spider legs, which are visible on the Glencairn, evenly drip the drops along the inner wall of Glencairn along. I note down fresh, fragrant caramel notes, vanilla pulp, orange juice, honey and freshly sawn wood. Some rum impressions, which are known heavy sweetness and some sharpness. No glue, which is common in younger grains.

    palate
    The oily streaks from the rim of the glass are reflected in a fabulous, warm creaminess that is extraordinary even for such a long-matured whiskey. Powerful, with cleanly integrated 49.4% ABV. Very delicious honey sweetness at the tip of the tongue. Powdered sugar, warm butter, dough, canned peaches. In the combination I think of steaming, warm apricot dumplings. Then caramel, orange zest and red apples. The rum from the nose has given way to sweet Rumrosines. Beautiful oak influences, with a barely noticeable, fine bitterness, reminiscent of almonds rather than an excess of unpleasant tannins, despite the decades in the barrel. Good balance of the individual components. Fine drop!

    Finish / Conclusion
    Caramel toffee. Werther's Original? Rather not. White chocolate and warm crème brûlée, again caramel and freshly cooked pear sauce. The aftertaste also knows how to convince. Very nice intense, multi-layered for a grain, just delicious! What's not to like? I have no real criticisms. I have tasted many old grains over the years, few have convinced me more than this delicious Grainman.

    Why are the grains, which in the first decades of their maturation often seem so interchangeable, with very long storage, usually more than four decades in the wood necessary, so great? Maybe there are other reasons, but at least two are close to me. On the one hand, the more neutral New Make naturally has much less tension than is usually the case with malt. It takes extreme maturity to score points over the barrel flavors. On the other hand, the cheaper grain, which is primarily produced as a cheap filling agent, is usually much less troublesome in barrel management than in the malt. The used (refill) barrels therefore take longer to convey really independent character. If it is true that about 60% of all the flavors of a finished whiskey depend on the barrels and not on the used new make, there might still be potential, you might think. But the bottleneck is usually not the new make, it's just the good barrels that are lacking.

    Further tasting notes and reviews on Facebook at #Maltkanzlei
    • Nose
      92 92
    • Taste
      90 90
    • Finish
      90 90

  8. ctu scored this whisky 91 points Connoisseur

    Divisive grain as I see. I've drank some grain, but for me that is a prominent in this category, because I don't feel the glue notes as I felt at the weaker grains. But I can understand my connoisseur colleague reviews and low points.
    • Nose
      91 91
      Floral. Grain, honey, vanilla and fruits. Almonds, rum and cognac.
    • Taste
      92 92
      Powerful, oily, creamy. Exotic fruits, honey, vanilla, rum and spicy bitterness.
    • Finish
      91 91
      Long, bittersweet, spicy. Bounty.

  9. joenl scored this whisky 95 points Newbie

    Presentation.... nope. Anyway double worth the dollar! Love this one!
    • Nose
      94 94
    • Taste
      96 96
    • Finish
      94 94

  10. Ouwezak scored this whisky 94 points Expert Junior

    • Nose
      96 96
    • Taste
      98 98
    • Finish
      93 93

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