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cfosterk
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 26-10-2016 at 01:24 am

Playing on ignorance and/or stupidity?

Or perhaps ebay fees are higher than i thought!!!

peatbogger
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 26-10-2016 at 01:52 am
lincolnimp wrote:
The Brora 40 year 1972 OB looks like it is still available at World of Whiskies but has gone up from £7000 to £7500.
Now look at this on line ebay trader called Whisky & Spirits on German ebay, because they only want 28000 euro for the same bottle, this is roughly £25000


There is greedy and then there is this.

It's got Serge's highest score EVER! Must be worth it.

It's travel retail only, so if you want it from World of Whiskies you have to pre-order it and pick it up at the tax free outlet as you return home from abroad, while on eBay you can stay in your couch wink
Stay home or endure the strive of a £17.500 vacation...
Or for the clever; fly somwhere 3 times for less than £2500 and pick up a bottle each time for the same price as you would pay for the one on eBay!

I see you've tasted it.
Hope you got away with less than £1100 for a 3cl wink


BenNevis
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 10-12-2016 at 22:14 pm

I used to like The Whisky Shop, but now there prices are way to high,  Macallan 12yo £70, LFW has it for £50 , 18yo Macallan £200,  LFW £150  just 2 examples.  I just called into the Nottingham shop to have a quick look today, One of the sales men in there was just showing a young couple who were looking  for a bottle for his dad for Christmas an 8yo and was saying " Only a 150 of these ever bottled and its finished off in a sherry cask for 6 months to make it a richer smother whisky"  . He new all the right things to say to get a sale. I think he must have been a used car salesman before he got the job in the shop happy

Signature Picture
Whisky Hamster
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 11-12-2016 at 09:58 am

It's interesting how prices drop when it becomes clear that there's enough availability of a presumed limited product as happened with Lagavulin 8 around here. As soon as the 2nd batch hit the shops a while ago, prices went from about 55-60 EUR down to 50 and below.

Speculating shops to such an extent as today are a novelty, in the past they had their fixed price whatever it might've been. They gotta be careful though, pissed off regulars might just as easily ditch their loyalty and begin to buy from the cheapest only. And if that happens to be amazon, all those nice smaller shops are eventually pretty f....ed. If you want your customers to pay the extra buck in the future, you'd better control your greed.

  Edited on 11-12-2016 at 10:01 am
Oh Laphroaig, where art thou?
BXpress
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 11-12-2016 at 10:49 am

It's interesting how prices drop when it becomes clear that there's enough availability of a presumed limited product as happened with Lagavulin 8 around here. As soon as the 2nd batch hit the shops a while ago, prices went from about 55-60 EUR down to 50 and below.

Speculating shops to such an extent as today are a novelty, in the past they had their fixed price whatever it might've been. They gotta be careful though, pissed off regulars might just as easily ditch their loyalty and begin to buy from the cheapest only. And if that happens to be amazon, all those nice smaller shops are eventually pretty f....ed. If you want your customers to pay the extra buck in the future, you'd better control your greed.


Very true. As soon as a new bottling hits the first 90 points, they tweak their prices very quickly. Last year's Ledaig 2004 SV bottlings were a great example. They started out at 67 Euros, two weeks after release cask 900175 was updated to 150.

They read Whiskyfun, they read WB. It would also be useful if we could set our Wishlist to private. Retailers don't need to know what i plan to buy.

whiskystore
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 11-12-2016 at 10:58 am
There is greedy and there is greedy, there is in some steps, these drops are expensive enough anyway without markup, I bought a 3 cl sample of the hero GunnarN for £ 262 ( love you brother )

lincolnimp wrote:
The Brora 40 year 1972 OB looks like it is still available at World of Whiskies but has gone up from £7000 to £7500.
Now look at this on line ebay trader called Whisky & Spirits on German ebay, because they only want 28000 euro for the same bottle, this is roughly £25000


There is greedy and then there is this.



whiskystore
mrgood
Expert Junior Junior Expert
Posted on 11-12-2016 at 17:27 pm
BenNevis wrote:

 I just called into the Nottingham shop to have a quick look today, One of the sales men in there was just showing a young couple who were looking  for a bottle for his dad for Christmas an 8yo and was saying " Only a 150 of these ever bottled and its finished off in a sherry cask for 6 months to make it a richer smother whisky"  . He new all the right things to say to get a sale. I think he must have been a used car salesman before he got the job in the shop happy

Did you call him on it?  You should.  It's incredibly satisfying, upon hearing a sales person gas on with a bunch of nonsense to a potentially uninitiated customer, to pipe up and correct them or start giving better advice that is based more on what the customer is actually looking for rather than trying to weasel them up to a bigger and bigger purchase.  

In your example, I might've said something like "be careful, it's a single cask bottling so the quality could be anything from amazing to abysmal.  Come, let's go online on my phone and see if we can find out what other people are saying about it... before you spend $200 on possible crap...  or maybe we can actually try it first.  Tell me mister store clerk guy, do you have this bottle open in the back for sampling?  ...why are you scowling?"
jvdb
Member Junior Junior Member
Posted on 13-12-2016 at 19:55 pm
NAMED & SHAMED:

Whisky Auction sites all over the world.

For still putting fake bottles of (mostly) Macallan up for sale. I'm still convinced it's THEIR responsibility. 
lincolnimp
Connoisseur Connoisseur
Posted on 14-12-2016 at 21:07 pm
mrgood wrote:
BenNevis wrote:

 I just called into the Nottingham shop to have a quick look today, One of the sales men in there was just showing a young couple who were looking  for a bottle for his dad for Christmas an 8yo and was saying " Only a 150 of these ever bottled and its finished off in a sherry cask for 6 months to make it a richer smother whisky"  . He new all the right things to say to get a sale. I think he must have been a used car salesman before he got the job in the shop happy

Did you call him on it?  You should.  It's incredibly satisfying, upon hearing a sales person gas on with a bunch of nonsense to a potentially uninitiated customer, to pipe up and correct them or start giving better advice that is based more on what the customer is actually looking for rather than trying to weasel them up to a bigger and bigger purchase.  

In your example, I might've said something like "be careful, it's a single cask bottling so the quality could be anything from amazing to abysmal.  Come, let's go online on my phone and see if we can find out what other people are saying about it... before you spend $200 on possible crap...  or maybe we can actually try it first.  Tell me mister store clerk guy, do you have this bottle open in the back for sampling?  ...why are you scowling?"

The thing is some people who go in whisky shops are not all really clued up on whisky so the sales patter works.
Lots of people go in their to buy whisky as a gift, the question is when the likes of us who know a little bit about whisky here this rubbish from a sales assistant do you
A - Say nothing because after all the owner has a business to run, maybe the assistant gets a bonus for bottles sold?
B - Say nothing but look disgusted and shake your head in full site of everyone thereby possibly inviting a question why you are doing it so you get an opportunity to vent your spleen?
C - Say loud and proud , hey my good sir your talking utter bollocks (or similar) and puy them right and correct them?

There is also the issue that the sales assistant might just be that and not know anything about whisky but just say what the boss says to attract a sale.
I was a in a new whisky shop recently  and there was a young lady assistant who was as helpful as she could be and very chatty, I asked how much a Haig blend was from the late 60`s early 70`s and she said its expensive because its old. She phoned the boss up and reported back it £180  , I smiled a little and said thank you just saying it was too expensive for what it was. The thing was the only thing she knew to say was that older was better.
If the owner had said it to me, different ball game.
On the plus side you could pay £4 or £5 and try a sample so at least you could try before you buy which I think is a big plus.
Whisky Hamster
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 14-12-2016 at 21:35 pm

Usually I try to stay out of the clerk's way unless the sales' lies pile up. Mind you, if the clerk is referring to a whisky's quality, it's always subjective to a degree and perhaps the customer is a newbie perfectly suited for a Fiddich 12 instead of e.g. an Arran 10 or Kilkerran 12, although I would prefer the latter any time. happy

But WHAT I like to do is approach unattended looking around customers and chat a bit and see if I can help them, recommend some stuff I see on the shelves. This way it's a win/win and the owner doesn't need to kick me out...haha
And you never know, sometimes you get acquainted to knowledgeable folk, too, who might have a hot tip for you.

  Edited on 14-12-2016 at 21:37 pm
Oh Laphroaig, where art thou?
mrgood
Expert Junior Junior Expert
Posted on 14-12-2016 at 21:40 pm
lincolnimp wrote:
Lots of people go in their to buy whisky as a gift, the question is when the likes of us who know a little bit about whisky here this rubbish from a sales assistant do you
A - Say nothing because after all the owner has a business to run, maybe the assistant gets a bonus for bottles sold?
B - Say nothing but look disgusted and shake your head in full site of everyone thereby possibly inviting a question why you are doing it so you get an opportunity to vent your spleen?
C - Say loud and proud , hey my good sir your talking utter bollocks (or similar) and puy them right and correct them?
D - casually insert yourself into the conversation to provide an alternative point of view.

That's what I do.  When someone is looking for a whisky gift they usually have a few keywords that they'd gleamed from the recipient.  It's pretty easy to interject with "sherry, you say?  That pricey 25yr Glenlivet you've got there might not be the best choice.  I'd go more for this Aberlour A'bunadh, or this Glendronach, or the Glenfarclas over here.  Or if you're on a budget, you can't go wrong with an Aberlour 10, it's a pretty good bargain...." etc etc.  usually all it takes is one reasonably informative sentence to hijack the conversation entirely.

I, for one, could never do B.  When I see people do that it just makes me laugh, like when the guy behind you in a slow line at the grocery store is shaking his head and going completely bonkers because it's "taking too long".  ha ha, relax, man, it only takes a minute to wait a minute.
  Edited on 14-12-2016 at 21:42 pm
peatbogger
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 14-12-2016 at 22:18 pm

I find it difficult to give advice to complete strangers.

Not long ago as I was browsing the shelves in a Swedish store a woman approached me and asked for advice for a gift to a friend.
She had obviously decided on a whisky but knew nothing about it herself, neither did she know much about the preferences of the recipient.
For some reason she had already picked up what seems to be the gift choice of novices; the Glenfiddich 12yo, and wanted to know if it was any good.
I don't know why people choose that one, might be the only one they've seen often enough to remember or it might be the simple classic design that give the impression of getting the most for the money.
I asked a couple of questions, but she looked more and more lost.
In a situation like that it's completely useless to start explaining about regional caracters, sherry, peat, age or complexity.
Concidering what was in the price range of the bottle she was holding I could have recommended a Bunnahabhain Moine or a Laphroaig Select at even less, but with that little info all I could say was; for someone new to whisky, it's a rather safe choise, I don't think he will be offended.
Walking out I was rather ashamed to have more or less recommended the 'fiddich amongst 50-60 other single malts.
lincolnimp
Connoisseur Connoisseur
Posted on 14-12-2016 at 22:22 pm
Its one thing doing it in a supermarket but in a private whisky shop that is another matter altogether when you are actively dissing the  owner of he shop in front of his paying customers.
I have interjected in this very scenario politely when a guy did not know what Glenfarclas/sherried whisky to buy someone and was looking at various options. I pointed out that older was not necessarily better and the 15 year was the best value for money,after the owner had spouted older is more or less better.
I also made a bit of a point  that 15 years is a generally recognised age for a single malt to let the distillery profile shine but also having enough cask influence to make an impact without swamping the spirit with wood.
To say I got a pissed off look is an understatement from the owner, he more of less  barged past me and put an old Glengoyne back on the shelf.
He tried to look pleased when they bought  the GF 15, he was less enthusiastic when all I bought was an old copy of Whisky Magazine.
But he is at least 25-35% more than the supermarket 2 miles away. That is  the beauty of being in the tourist part of a city (for a seller) tourists do not know where the cheaper alternatives are?
  Edited on 14-12-2016 at 22:26 pm
BXpress
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 15-12-2016 at 14:49 pm
peatbogger wrote:

I find it difficult to give advice to complete strangers.

Not long ago as I was browsing the shelves in a Swedish store a woman approached me and asked for advice for a gift to a friend.
She had obviously decided on a whisky but knew nothing about it herself, neither did she know much about the preferences of the recipient.
For some reason she had already picked up what seems to be the gift choice of novices; the Glenfiddich 12yo, and wanted to know if it was any good.
I don't know why people choose that one, might be the only one they've seen often enough to remember or it might be the simple classic design that give the impression of getting the most for the money.
I asked a couple of questions, but she looked more and more lost.
In a situation like that it's completely useless to start explaining about regional caracters, sherry, peat, age or complexity.
Concidering what was in the price range of the bottle she was holding I could have recommended a Bunnahabhain Moine or a Laphroaig Select at even less, but with that little info all I could say was; for someone new to whisky, it's a rather safe choise, I don't think he will be offended.
Walking out I was rather ashamed to have more or less recommended the 'fiddich amongst 50-60 other single malts.


Not sure about that anymore. Few months ago i tasted Fiddich 12, a very contemporary version and it was rough as shit. Most beginners are not in for the taste but for the smoothness. They still have to lose that fear of drinking neat. All beginners need that "wow i can drink it without coke and i'm not throwing up" moment. I would always recommend Glenmo 10, it is consistently soft and inoffensive.

praisethepasta
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 18-12-2016 at 10:53 am
BXpress wrote:
peatbogger wrote:

I find it difficult to give advice to complete strangers.

Not long ago as I was browsing the shelves in a Swedish store a woman approached me and asked for advice for a gift to a friend.
She had obviously decided on a whisky but knew nothing about it herself, neither did she know much about the preferences of the recipient.
For some reason she had already picked up what seems to be the gift choice of novices; the Glenfiddich 12yo, and wanted to know if it was any good.
I don't know why people choose that one, might be the only one they've seen often enough to remember or it might be the simple classic design that give the impression of getting the most for the money.
I asked a couple of questions, but she looked more and more lost.
In a situation like that it's completely useless to start explaining about regional caracters, sherry, peat, age or complexity.
Concidering what was in the price range of the bottle she was holding I could have recommended a Bunnahabhain Moine or a Laphroaig Select at even less, but with that little info all I could say was; for someone new to whisky, it's a rather safe choise, I don't think he will be offended.
Walking out I was rather ashamed to have more or less recommended the 'fiddich amongst 50-60 other single malts.

couple of weeks ago, I was in a supermarket, browsing their whiskies. A couple stopped and were talking about what to buy for their brother (in law). The knew he liked warm, sweeter style whisky, but he was somewhat of a novice too. They didn't know what to get him. As they finally reached for a Chivas Regal, a gift pack with two extra glasses (tumblers, of course), I felt I had to step in. Got them to buy a Balvenie 12 double wood for basically the same amount of money and explained it was a safe bet as far as easy drinking single malts go, a good introduction to the world of single malts. Yes, it 's a bit more expensive than the 'Fiddich 12, but IMHO just a more rewarding, better balanced, richer whisky... Felt good about myself the rest of the day, and as far as blends go, I actually even quite like Chivas Regal 12, but sometimes a man 's gotta do what a man's gotta do happy

The turtle moves My Collection
Whisky Hamster
Member Senior Senior Member
Posted on 19-12-2016 at 12:02 pm

[...] They didn't know what to get him. As they finally reached for a Chivas Regal, a gift pack with two extra glasses (tumblers, of course), [...] Felt good about myself the rest of the day, and as far as blends go, I actually even quite like Chivas Regal 12, but sometimes a man 's gotta do what a man's gotta do happy

Same here. It's common (especially during Christmas season) to see mostly middle-aged men browsing supermarket shelves, skipping all single malt bargains and grabbing a CR12 or Dimple as it is the only thing they know or the brand they deem reputable. If they look a bit unsure and/or overwhelmed by the malt selection they lack a category for, I like to help them on their journey and more than once they left with e.g. 12 Doublewood/Quinta Ruban/Arran10.
I consider this work community service to make the world a better, classier place...haha!

Oh Laphroaig, where art thou?
lincolnimp
Connoisseur Connoisseur
Posted on 20-12-2016 at 09:08 am
The Whisky Barrel in the UK has this bottle for £1000 or roughly 1200 euro.

I will shout this now
THE WHISKY BARREL ARE ROBBING B******S, and that is being as polite as I can.


  Edited on 15-06-2017 at 11:31 am
BXpress
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 20-12-2016 at 17:04 pm
lincolnimp wrote:
The Whisky Barrel in the UK has this bottle for £1000 or roughly 1200 euro.

I will shout this now
THE WHISKY BARREL ARE ROBBING BASTARDS, and that is being as polite as I can.


It took the 30yo Brora releases 6 years to get to that price. I wouldn't trade even the lowest scoring of them for 5 Ardbeg 21s. Just saying.

Other Shops are making a profit while selling it for 500 Euro. Makes you wonder what the import price is. 300?400?

peatbogger
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 20-12-2016 at 18:11 pm
lincolnimp wrote:
The Whisky Barrel in the UK has this bottle for £1000 or roughly 1200 euro.

I will shout this now
THE WHISKY BARREL ARE ROBBING BASTARDS, and that is being as polite as I can.


Don't know what their level is at for regular bottles, but it seems they're not in a hurry to get the more scarse stuff out the door.

They also offer this at £3850 (= €4580)
Concidering there's one bottle at the marketplace for €1000 I would call them vultures.

BenNevis
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 21-12-2016 at 18:38 pm
peatbogger wrote:
lincolnimp wrote:
The Whisky Barrel in the UK has this bottle for £1000 or roughly 1200 euro.

I will shout this now
THE WHISKY BARREL ARE ROBBING BASTARDS, and that is being as polite as I can.


Don't know what their level is at for regular bottles, but it seems they're not in a hurry to get the more scarse stuff out the door.

They also offer this at £3850 (= €4580)
Concidering there's one bottle at the marketplace for €1000 I would call them vultures.


I brought a bottle very similar to this when it was released. I paid £140



  Edited on 21-12-2016 at 18:38 pm
Signature Picture
cavalier66
Expert Senior Senior Expert
Posted on 30-12-2016 at 15:24 pm
Stefan at Nonjatta will have thoughts about this I suspect...
£91,000 for the first 7 ghost series bottlings - most of which cost a few hundred when they were released

lincolnimp
Connoisseur Connoisseur
Posted on 30-12-2016 at 15:55 pm
cavalier66 wrote:
Stefan at Nonjatta will have thoughts about this I suspect...
£91,000 for the first 7 ghost series bottlings - most of which cost a few hundred when they were released

I know Japanese whisky is good but that is one juggernaut I never climbed onto, I still cannot fathom why people think it is worth so much?
I stopped trying to figure that one ages ago, the same applies to a lesser degree with Port Ellen & Brora price wise.

  Edited on 30-12-2016 at 15:55 pm
VaryingViewpoint
Moderator Moderator
Posted on 02-02-2017 at 02:15 am

Hard To Find Whisky is asking for a King's ransom for the new King's Glendronach - Signed by USA President Donald Trump - 1985 26 year old http://www.htfw.com/glendronach-signed-by-usa-president-donald-trump-1985-26-year-old

I thought Trump's brand name recognition was going in the toilet? I guess not when it comes to scotch!wink

  Edited on 02-02-2017 at 22:10 pm
One life... Drink it well
peatbogger
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 02-02-2017 at 22:01 pm

Hard To Find Whisky is asking for a King's ransom for the new King's Glendronach - Signed by USA President Donald Trump - 1985 26 year old http://www.htfw.com/glendronach-signed-by-usa-president-donald-trump-1985-26-year-old

I thought Trump's name recognition was going in the toilet? I guess not when it comes to scotch!wink


Don't know about going in the toilet, seems like his orders are taken seriously.

The former Norwegian priminister, who's been a White House guest several times as well as host for both Bush and Clinton, now a peace negotiator arrived at Washington DC last night and was taken aside and questioned for more than an hour because he had an old Iranian visa in his diplomatic passport.

Some moron in a red cap will buy this whisky and store it in his doomsday bunker to toast the greatnes of President Ignoramus Maximus while Kim's radiating mushrooms are growing in his garden.
karloff
Specialist Specialist
Posted on 02-02-2017 at 22:35 pm

Hard To Find Whisky is asking for a King's ransom for the new King's Glendronach - Signed by USA President Donald Trump - 1985 26 year old http://www.htfw.com/glendronach-signed-by-usa-president-donald-trump-1985-26-year-old

I thought Trump's brand name recognition was going in the toilet? I guess not when it comes to scotch!wink



Signed is the key word, it's only a matter of time before a lone gunman on a grassy knoll blows his wig off, then the value will go up.

I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy. Tom Waits
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